Hospice provides eight ways to cope with grief during the coronavirus outbreak

Hospice provides eight ways to cope with grief during the coronavirus outbreak

St Barnabas Hospice has put together a helpful guide for those coping with a bereavement during this difficult time.

The coronavirus has caused much worry, anxiety and upset around the world. Local charity, St Barnabas Hospice, understands what a difficult period of time it will be for many, particularly those who are going through a bereavement or are facing the end of a loved one’s life.

Whatever your situation, the Hospice has provided eight helpful ways to cope during this period of uncertainty.

Mandy Irons, Head of Wellbeing at St Barnabas Hospice, said: “The coronavirus is a totally new situation to us all, and one which we must adapt to in the best way we can. Many people will be juggling the worries associated with isolation, work and carer responsibilities whilst also going through a bereavement.

“At St Barnabas, we provide free, local support throughout the year for all adults across Lincolnshire who may be struggling with a bereavement, regardless of whether their loved one died in our Hospice or not.

“We would normally offer one-to-one or group counselling, but we appreciate that this won’t be possible in the current situation.

“Our alternative offering is to share our advice far and wide, as well as providing a call-back service to those who need our support the most.

“We have put together eight helpful ways to cope with a bereavement during the coronavirus outbreak.”

The St Barnabas Hospice eight tips for coping with bereavement are:

1. Give yourself permission to cry or be emotional – it is ok to show your feelings.

2. Include the person in some way – perhaps light a candle or raise a toast.

3. Give people permission to talk about your loved one. They may be frightened of upsetting you or saying the wrong thing, so let them know it’s ok to share memories, perhaps by starting a conversation or recalling a memory.

4. If you are feeling lonely whilst in isolation, reach out to someone. Pick up the phone, send an email, or start a video chat. The power of a friendly face, voice or words will help relieve some of that loneliness.

5. Let loved one know how you are feeling. We all grieve in different ways and you may need to let others know about your feelings and worries. They may not know what to say otherwise.

6. Take advantage of a daily walk or run. Exercise will help the mind relax and, as long as you comply with the coronavirus regulations, it will do you good to have a change of scenery once a day.

7. Sometimes it is easier to talk to people who aren’t family or friends, but who understand how difficult a bereavement can be. St Barnabas has launched a call-back system for those who need that bit extra help and support.

8. Above all, be kind to yourself. Remember, this is just another day.

As one-to-one counselling sessions and bereavement groups at St Barnabas have been put on hold, the Counselling team has launched a call-back service for those who need bereavement support during the coronavirus outbreak.

Visit www.stbarnabashospice.co.uk/supportive-phonecall to request a call back from one of their dedicated staff and volunteers.

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